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tv   World News Today  BBC News  June 23, 2017 9:00pm-9:31pm BST

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this is bbc world news today. our top stories. more than 800 households and tower blocks in camden, north london, are to be evacuated because of safety concerns over cladding in the aftermath of the grenfell tower fire. grenfell changes everything andi fire. grenfell changes everything and i don't believe we can take any risks with our residents' ‘s safety. the british prime minister theresa may has been told her offer for eu citizens in the uk isn't enough. my first impression is that the offer is below expectations and it risks worsening the situation of citizens. reports from turkey say five people have died after being electrocuted at a water park. an investigation is under way. time to shut down aljazeera? say gulf countries upping the stakes in their row with qatar, the owner of the broadcast network.
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the issue a list of demands in a growing crisis. welcome to world leaders today. more than 800 hollings in tower blocks on a council estate in camden, north london are being evacuated because of safety concern. camden council says residents in flat in five towers and the chalcots estate will be moved for urgent safety work. it follows the fire in last week in which 79 people died. the last few minutes, we have heard from georgia gould, leader of camden council. she explained why the decision has been made. ever since the tragic fire at grenfell, we have done everything we can to check the safety of our blog. on wednesday we were first in the queue to check the cladding on our
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blocks. what we found was the installation was safe but the external cladding was not up to the standard that we wanted and was not fire retardant. obviously this was very disappointed and we share that disappointment with our residents. we've had a public meeting on thursday with residents were they concerned about fire safety that i hadn't been aware of. i immediately asked council staff and fire services to be in those blocks making the text. they said they could —— they said they could not confirm safety. i have made the difficult decision to move residents into temporary accommodation while we we re temporary accommodation while we were make urgent changes. i know it is difficult but grenfell changes everything and we cannot take risks with our tenants' everything and we cannot take risks with our tena nts' safety everything and we cannot take risks with our tenants' safety and have
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put them first. we made the decision to move people into temporary accommodation, probably, about two hours ago, in conversation with fire services and staff will we knew that we could not be sure that people would be safe in their building. this evening. we have moved incredibly quickly to inform residents, set up a centre, move people into hotel accommodation or where they can, stay with family and friends. what time will you move residents? people are on the ground now talking to residents, working with them, do you move them to the rest centre. it's happening immediately. we have fire services on the ground to explain what's going on, do this whole process we have an open and transparent with oui’ have an open and transparent with our residents, we will continue to be safe. we know it's scary time but we will make sure they stay safe and thatis we will make sure they stay safe and that is happening right now. georgia
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gould there is explaining the urgent evacuation here in north london, of 800 households in one estate. we'll keep you updated on that. european leaders have criticised the offer to eu citizens living in the uk from the british prime minister theresa may after the start of brexit talks in brussels. it is exactly a year since the referendum vote which has unleashed political turmoil here. the british prime minister is now weakened with a minority government after the general election. in her offer, she says eu citizens can stay in the uk if british people who live in europe are given a similar deal. theresa may says that her plans will see no families split up because of the brexit process. eu citizens with five years' residence would have ‘settled status', meaning lifetime access to free health care, education and benefits. and there would be a grace period for newer arrivals from the eu to the uk. the bbc‘s laura kuennsberg reports from brussels of the final day of the summit. goodbye to the flag, goodbye to this town.
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a year ago today, britain decided this place would be written out of our future. but what the picture outside will look like for millions who have made their lives around the continent is now starting to become clear. we've set out what i believe is a serious offer, a fair offer, that will give the reassurance to eu citizens living in the uk. one—two—one attempts to sell her plans. but citizens who have lived in the uk for five years can remain for good. and until we leave the union, others could come. but her eu rivals have plenty of questions. what about spaniards now in the uk with family abroad — or anyone else? is the cut—off date when the brexit process started, or the moment when we actually leave? not until monday will ministers at home be ready to give those answers.
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are you getting a clear idea of the kind of brexit that the uk government wants? no. translation: it's vauge. we want to be sure the rights of citizens are protected. that's important for us. there are a lot of our citizens who are not covered with mrs may's proposal. she might not have gone far enough here, but for many at home is theresa may's plan tough enough? it gives those 3 million eu citizens in the uk certainty about the future of their lives, and we want the same certainty for the more thani million uk citizens who are living in the european union. you've always said voters gave politicians a clear instruction to control immigration. but under your plans, for nearly another two years, as many europeans as they like can still come to live in the uk. for many voters, do you think that will really sound like taking back control? what voters voted for when they voted to leave the european union was to ensure that outside the european union, the united kingdom could establish our own rules on migration, on movement of people from the eu into the uk. away from home, there is relief that
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at last the uk's putting things on the table. but for europe's new power couple... translation: it's a good beginning, but not a breakthrough. we've understood the uk doesn't want to give you citizens full rights. they, just as they left together, will decide together with the rest of the eu how they feel about that. my first impression is that the uk's offer is below our expectations. and that it risks worsening the situation of citizens. reservation is shared by the opposition. who, in contrast, their leader is loving his time in the sun. we should not be negotiating like this. what we should be doing is unilaterally saying, as labour has said from day one after the referendum, but all eu nationals should be given permanent residence' rights. concerns over these proposals reflects theresa may's 3—way bind.
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a united in opposing front here in brussels, clashing expectations among the public at home, and at her back inside her own party, different strands of thinking and demands. and even a leader at the peak of their powers would struggle to deal with all that. prime minister, did your proposals go far enough? relieved, perhaps, to be leaving. but relieved, perhaps, too, to be away from hostility at home. but governing is doing, notjust fending off enemies. theresa may, at least today, has been doing that. the us has played down the dispute between qatar and its neighbour. earlier today, the saudis backed by
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bahrain, the uae and egypt, issued 13 demands that qatar must meet within ten days. it's the worst political crisis in the gulf region for decades. now qatar has been given just ten days to comply with a list of demand if the blockade is to be listed. saudi arabia, uae and egypt and bahrain accused catarrh of funding the powerless groups and fostering instability, with the demand. what is on the less? according to a list, qatar has been asked to curb trade relations with iran. and close the turkish military base, something ankara is willing to do. and then there is aljazeera, supported by qatar's government, one of the most widely watched arabic channel. qatar, according to the demand curve
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must shut down the channel and its affiliates including an it english network. it has been subjected to weeks of sanctions. earlier this week, the us expressed its frustrations, saying qatar must set up frustrations, saying qatar must set upa frustrations, saying qatar must set up a reasonable and actionable conditions for listing them. now it has been two weeks since the embargo, we are mystified the gulf state has not released to the public 01’ state has not released to the public or the qataris the details about the claims they are mating towards qatar. the list has been made public but we are waiting for a response from the tha. that includes demands that qatar has already insisted it would never be willing to make. as we heard that, closure of al jazeera is one of the main demand. i spoke to the mark bell shabbat, a
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young seniorjournalists spoke to the mark bell shabbat, a young senior journalists and spokesman for aljazeera young senior journalists and spokesman for al jazeera and young senior journalists and spokesman for aljazeera and said if they are worried about closure. not at all. we have grown accustomed to this pressure that has been exerted on us ever this pressure that has been exerted on us ever since the inception of al jazeera, more than 20 years ago. we we re jazeera, more than 20 years ago. we were the first independent news network in the arab world, as a result because we continue to speak truth to power and provide information to the citizens not only 110w information to the citizens not only now of the arab world but the entire globe, there are governments who have probably the worst track record of human rights, the worst track record of respecting freedom of expression and information, and all other human rights. they insist on cracking down on us. we have grown accustomed to that. we will continue oui’ accustomed to that. we will continue our message which is clear, to provide balanced, quality information and news to our viewers wherever they may be. it is their
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right, enshrined by the un charter for human rights, the freedom of information, it is something we held sacrosa nct information, it is something we held sacrosanct regardless of what other political developments are going on, those are four different countries to deal journalists. the aljazeera, asjournalists, the message is clear and that is sacred. it isa message is clear and that is sacred. it is a message we will continue regardless of what happened. have you reported the criticisms of ka bsa, you reported the criticisms of kabsa, made not only by the gulf states but also by others previously, that it has funded militant groups from sunny or shia side? we have reported news whenever it has happened. i myself have done report on the board treatment of migrant workers in qatar and the need for the qatar government to improve the condition. but reports
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in other qatar funded groups are not providing any evidence from less time of the journalist perspective, they are meaningless. it's a duty of institutions and the journalism industry that they don't announce propaganda that is being pushed by certain gulf countries either through e—mails of ambassadors in washington or other institutions they have bought out or to correspondence like we saw who was sacked from the wall streetjournal in the past 2a hours, that we shouldn't be peddling out that propaganda. at the risk of showing these props is not so great, here are some of our internationally recognised awards. this is the peabody award which aljazeera one. this is the royal television society award. aljazeera is acknowledged by all the major institutions, by all oui’ all the major institutions, by all our viewers as being quality information and quality news.
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there has beenbeen a terrible incident at a water park in the city of sakarya to the north—west of the country. its thought three children, and two adults who tried to rescue them have been electrocuted. ozge ozdemir from the bbc turkish gave more details. three children right now, while they we re three children right now, while they were swimming in the pool, though of electricity and the owner of the pool and his son tried to jump electricity and the owner of the pool and his son tried tojump in the pool to save the kids, so u nfortu nately the pool to save the kids, so unfortunately five of them have died. there were a couple of other people trying to help them, they we re people trying to help them, they were also trying to jump to be pool but they understood there was electricity in the pool, so they had some minor injuries. but the thing is that unfortunately five people have died. we don't want to speculate about exactly what has happened here, it is absolutely
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tragic obviously. do we have any idea about the safety precautions that were in place there or the safety record germany? the news agency, safety record germany? the news ne safety record germany? the news agency, one of the biggest ones in turkey, they are reporting about the ca bles turkey, they are reporting about the cables around the pool, i guess there were some restoration that was going on over there. so u nfortu nately going on over there. so unfortunately right now we don't know the real reason, but the speculation is that there were some ca bles speculation is that there were some cables and that was one of the reasons for that. is that those kind of accidents, everyone right now on social media are talking about the neglect in that kind of event. beforehand, maybe not that kind of an accident but we also know that there was such were some accident and funfairs, some children died because of the precautions not being taken so seriously. so those kind of accidents can be talked about in turkey. stay reverse here on bbc world news.
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still to come, i speak to a rugby legend ahead of the first test match between the british and irish lions and new zealand in auckland. members of the neo—nazi resistance stormed to the world trade center armed with pistols and is shot down. we believe that according to national law that we have a right to claim certain part of this country of ourland. claim certain part of this country of our land. i take pride in the words, blocks. blocks. ich bin ein berliner. he pleaded guilty to murdering john manning. research council say that the great
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increase in line cancer is due may leave that to smoking tobacco. closing time for checkpoint charlie which has starred on the border as a mark of our determination to defend the city. —— allied determination. this is bbc world news today. 800 households in tower blocks in camden, north london, are being evacuated because of safety concerns over cladding in the aftermath of the grenfell fire. and other news today, a cool response from the eu's top bureaucrat to britain's's first bid to the divorce talk. he says the offer about the status of eu citizens here is not sufficient.
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trump's health bill is facing criticism. he said he was happy with it. earlier i spoke to a correspondent to say what this would affect the bill. this republican senator has said he will not support the bill in its current form. that means that this bill is in its current form will not pass the senate. this would be an embarrassing and major blow both to donald trump and to the republicans who have had several goes at writing this legislation, this key piece of legislation which was a campaign promise. to put it into perspective, when you look at the senator's state of nevada, it is one that hillary clinton won, he is up for real action next year, and many of people
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in the state rely on medicaid. it is for the poorest in america. under this legislation, it would be heavily rolled back over the next three years. many people fear that the likes of nevada, there would be a number of people who would not survive with regards to getting the health care that they need. and in one meeting, town hall meeting, that he had when he went back, he was bombarded with questions about health care. within the last hour, health care. within the last hour, he has said he will not reported. the fifth republic and to do so. on the right flank of the party, you have those who fear that this legislation does not go far enough. they want more of this affordable ca re they want more of this affordable care act swept away, it's a party thatis care act swept away, it's a party that is currently not looking united and certainly not on the same page. donald trump said he was in a right to deliver to bring change, but is crucial. on the other foreign policy
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flank, trump is facing fire and the russian investigation. bring us up—to—date about that and robert mueller. when it comes to robert mueller, we have heard from the white house secretary sean spicer that he won't be firing bob miller, —— robert mueller, and whether or not russia meddled in the election and collusion between russia and the us. it looks like he's not going to be fired. but he certainly the kind of president in that interview and the clip you heard, is throwing some doubt as to how independent mr miller may be. he seems to have been friends with britain —— with james kelly. the fbi director gave testimony about conversations about what he believed in place in which emitjames what he believed in place in which emit james comey said
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what he believed in place in which emitjames comey said dropping —— asking to drop investigations into michael flynn, the former security adviser. then there was that the battle about whether or not there we re battle about whether or not there were tapes of that conversation. trump hinted they were, yesterday we got the news that there are not. when it comes to the account of these conversations, president trump does not have the backing of a tape, james comey has those contemporaneous memos that he took after each visit. by throwing, perhaps, some shade and robert mueller, perhaps he's trying to say, look, hang on a second, robert mueller will take james comey‘s side on this only a few hours to go now before the first test match between the british and irish lions and new zealand in auckland. the bookies make the all blacks firm favourites for the game, but many analysts think it will be tight — with the set piece being a key battle ground area. the all blacks also
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have a formidable record at eden park and haven't lost there in over 20 years. david campese won the world cup with australia in 1991 and also played against the british lion in 1989. he gave me his thoughts ahead of the first test on saturday. i think there's going to be a very interesting test match.|j i think there's going to be a very interesting test match. i think the first couple of games, the lions struggled. but to beat the crusaders, who are leading super rugby down here, and then beating the chiefs, was a bit of a blow to the chiefs, was a bit of a blow to the all blacks. it looks like it. looks like an interesting game and i spoke to one gentleman at the hong kong sevens, at the airport, you said you are lucky, you have four teams he played well in the six nations and you have a lot of players to choose from. i think tomorrow, it will be a surprise. the lions, if you look at the way they've been playing, they have some
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good players. sam warburton was the captain, he's on the bench. that shows you the players are standing up shows you the players are standing up to be counted. i think the all blacks last week 170 80, but it's not really a great sort of warm up toa not really a great sort of warm up to a british and irish lions team that has a good defence, good set pieces, and good attacking players. i will be interesting. i think the all blacks win by five or ten points. the all blacks have not lost a game at the stadium since 1994. for those of us who are not by 1994. for those of us who are not rugby legends, can you explain to us why this is such an incredible moment? it is. i was why this is such an incredible moment? it is. iwas fortunate in 1986, going backa moment? it is. iwas fortunate in 1986, going back a few years, we won the cup against the all blacks in new zealand. it's not an easy feat
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to do and we haven't won since. it's a bit like to the english or cardiff arms park to the welsh or murrayfield in scotland. that is a tradition, that's what eden park is to the all blacks, where they win everything, why they play games there. there's something about the ground. some sort of tradition or this is where we started, this is where we have laid our bodies on the line to win. that is why it is such a hard place to play. but again, anything is possible. the french did it in 1994. so in that year, the springboks had a draw with the all blacks. it can be beaten but again, you have to play your best rugby on the day. the all blacks are a great team, the best in the world. they've got great skills, and great individual playmakers, guys who can
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create something from nothing. but in the lions you also have great players as well. it's one of those test matches where you'll sit there and watch on the edge of your seat for 80 minutes. buti and watch on the edge of your seat for 80 minutes. but i think that's the tradition of rugby, why the british lions get so much attention around the world, is the only chance from players from ireland who beat the all blacks but the welsh and scottish have a chance to beat the all blacks in one team. sam warburton was left out, what do you make of that? i think that shows you the of players he has. when you have players who are performing, it doesn't matter who is captain, the coach will have players on form. he has a good scrum, a great set of back rowers, and that what happened. if you don't perform, you get kicked out. stay with us. hello there. world weather stories
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seem to have been dominated by extreme heat. more on that in a moment. but i want a recount and storm cindy. she made landfall on thursday morning, fragmented as she did into two main areas of rain. we saw 200 millimetres of rainfall from this system, which you can see by the bright, vibrant echoes more one circulation here close to the borders of texas, another moving through bouts of louisiana. we have some localised flooding. the scenes from mississippi, with some the entitys interstates flooded and some will take its time to subside. but the storm will track north—east out of tennessee and into new york, easing as it does so. behind it, across the west coast of the talking
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point is the heat. we could see some dry lightning storms which will exacerbate the risk of some wildfires as we move through the weekend. we had record—breaking heat in las vegas on wednesday with 48 degrees despite temperatures just easing, not by very much. phoenix, arizona still likely to see 48 celsius as a daytime maximum. across south asia, heavy rain is the talking port from the monsoon. parts of bangladesh and march through the weekend have rain. as we go through latter stages of the weekend, perhaps the north eastern states as well. another 200 to 400 millimetres is quite possible, widely across bangladesh and brian mark, exacerbating flag issues. across to asia, the mayan flood drifts northward away from hong kong, taking it to shanghai and the
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southern fringes of japan. some taking it to shanghai and the southern fringes ofjapan. some rain will be quite expensive and again, could cause issues with some localised flooding. we will keep you posted and development as and when they occur through the next couple of days. elsewhere, across europe, wings have been hot. it fresh air into the weekend, across the uk and northern europe, in low to mid 20s temperature. but it settled and sunny, not as hot as it has been, but that's the place to be for sunshine. a detailed forecasts for the uk coming up injust under half an hour but the fresher story. breezy conditions, sunshine and showers. but it may have escaped your attention that it's glastonbury this weekend. this is a live shot from early on, where's the mud? we have not seen significant rain for quite some time and it looks as if the weather will behave itself in the weather will behave itself in the weekend, even when you're clearing away on monday. goodbye. will this is bbc news. the
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headlines. more than 800 homes in tower blocks in camden, north london are being evacuated because of safety concerns over cladding, in the aftermath of the grenfell tower fire. the council leader says they did not want to risk the safety of people. europe's most senior official has criticised the british offered to eu nationals after brexit claiming it could worsen the situation for some of them. the eu council president donald tusk said the proposal was below their expectations. reports from turkey say five people including as my children have died after being electrocuted at a water park in
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